The Count of Monte Cristo _ V For Vendetta

The Count of Monte Cristo _ V For Vendetta

Justice is an artificial construct that people utilize to punish people that breach the laws a society develops. In some cases, the punishment that a criminal receives may not be what they actually deserve. When the penalty does not fit the crime, some people look for to bring an equal quantity of suffering to the criminal. Generally, making use of vengeance is individual as a private wants to achieve retribution for a previous action that negatively impacts them. One such example of vengeance in society would be the famous case of the 47 Ronin throughout the 18th century.

The Ronin strategy the assassination of the guy who is responsible for their master’s murder and 2 years later on, they decapitate him. They avenge their master as an indication of commitment and respect towards him. The style of revenge is likewise in use in various mediums such as in movies and unique. Alexandre Dumas uses the theme of revenge in his novel, The Count of Monte Cristo. Likewise, the fundamental theme of vengeance is in usage in James McTeigue’s V for Vendetta. What specific techniques help depict the prevailing style of revenge in both The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta?

The characters of Edmond Dantes and V in The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta, respectively, present the fundamental style of vengeance. The plots in both The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta likewise help portray the prevailing theme of revenge. The use of discussion in The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta similarly reveal the theme of revenge. For that reason, vengeance is the ruling theme in The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta and this is evident through the methods character, plot and dialogue. To start, the theme of revenge exists through the technique character in the characters f Edmond Dantes in The Count of Monte Cristo and V from V for Vendetta. Initially, the theme of revenge exists through the character of Edmond Dantes. For example, throughout his time in the jail Chateau d’If, Edmond fulfills Abbe Faria who informs Edmond that his jail time is unjust. Faria quickly regrets the information he gives Edmond “Due to the fact that it has instilled a new passion in [his] heart– that of vengeance” (Dumas 168). Revenge exists in the character of Edmond through his desire to seek vengeance on Fernand, Danglars and Villefort, who are the males who betray Edmond during his successful time as a young person.

Second, the style of vengeance exists through the character of V in V for Vendetta. For example, V’s only inspiration is to seek vengeance on the individuals that break him emotionally and those who corrupt England’s federal government. Evey finds V’s murder of Lewis Prothero troubling, however V thinks that “Violence can be utilized for excellent. Justice” (McTeigue V for Vendetta). Revenge is present in the character of V who murders corrupt individuals on his journey to seek vengeance. Despite the fact that the style of vengeance exists in both The Count of Monte Cristo and the V for Vendetta through he strategy character, both characters have contrasting factors as to why they dedicate their particular vendettas. Edmond Dantes’ mission for vengeance exclusively relies on him attempting to destroy the lives of Fernand, Danglars and Villefort. Contrastingly, V’s vendetta not just relies on getting back at the people who injured him, but he also fights for the flexibility of the British people. The theme of vengeance exists through the technique character. Indeed, the style of revenge exists in both The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta through the strategy character.

Edmond Dantes from The Count of Monte Cristo embodies the theme of vengeance through his function as a representative of Providence. Similarly, the character of V from V for Vendetta presents the theme of revenge through his individual vendetta. While the style of vengeance exists in both The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta through the technique character, the strategy plot similarly represents the style of vengeance. To continue, the style of revenge exists through the strategy plot in The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta. First, the theme of vengeance is present through the plot of The

Count of Monte Cristo. In The Count of Monte Cristo, Edmond Dantes transforms himself into a vengeful, inhuman person that goes by the name of Monte Cristo to serve as an agent of Providence “… due to the fact that the important things that I know which is finest, biggest and most superb in the world is to reward and to penalize” (Dumas 556). The plot of The Count of Monte Cristo provides the theme of revenge through the strategy plot by the representation of Edmond as the almighty judge, jury and executioner. Second, the theme of vengeance exists within the plot of V for Vendetta. In V or Vendetta, V kills members of the police state of England in an effort to liberate the country, as his belief is that “People shouldn’t be afraid of their federal government. Governments need to hesitate of their people.” (McTeigue V for Vendetta). The theme of vengeance is present through the strategy plot in V for Vendetta. Although the plots of The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta have their differences, both include a similar approach in how the plot progresses. In The Count of Monte Cristo, Edmond Dantes turns himself into Monte Cristo to xact revenge on Fernand, Danglars and Villefort. Similarly, in V for Vendetta, V murders individuals responsible for his torture and prominent political figures to free the country. Both The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta feature a single character that emerges from the worst possible circumstance to precise revenge on those that did them incorrect. The style of revenge exists through the method plot in The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta. To be sure, the strategy plot provides the theme of revenge in The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta.

In The Count of Monte Cristo, the theme of revenge exists through the personification of the justice system. Similarly, in V for Vendetta, the plot follows the character of V and his individual vendetta versus the British government. The strategy plot presents the style of revenge in The Count of Monte Cristo and the V for Vendetta while the method discussion also assists to stress the theme of vengeance. Last, the style of vengeance exists through the method dialogue in The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta. First, the theme of revenge exists through discussion in

The Count of Monte Cristo. Edmond’s discovery of the treasure on the island of Monte Cristo instills the thought that God provides him the treasure so that he can serve as a representative of Providence. For example, Edmond turns himself into a man with no forgiveness to perform his mission of revenge by mentioning “goodbye, goodness, humankind, appreciation … Goodbye all those feelings that nourish and illuminate the heart! I have actually taken the place of Providence to reward the excellent; now let the avenging God make way for me to penalize the offender” (Dumas 300). The style of engeance exists in The Count of Monte Cristo through the method discussion that express Edmond’s modification in his character. Second, the theme of vengeance is present through discussion in V for Vendetta. V’s experiences in his past turn him into a ruthless killer who is on a quest of vengeance to validate his pain and to take down the corrupt British federal government. To illustrate, V believes that “The only decision is revenge; a vendetta held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and accuracy of such will one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous” (McTeigue V for

Vendetta). Vengeance is present within the discussion of V for Vendetta, as V expresses himself through his effective declarations. In contrast, the method discussion emphasizes the theme of revenge in both The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta, through the discovery of the protagonists’ inner ideas and feelings. In The Count of Monte Cristo, Dumas uses dialogue to present the radical changes in the character of Edmond Dantes. Similarly, the use of discussion in V for Vendetta likewise expresses the numerous morals that V follows and the application of those orals in his vendetta. The theme of revenge is present through the strategy discussion in The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta. The ruling theme in both The Count of Monte Cristo and V for Vendetta is vengeance and this is evident through the techniques character, plot and discussion. In Alexandre Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo, the methods character, plot and discussion stress the style of revenge. Similarly, James McTeigue effectively uses the techniques character, plot and discussion to signify the style of vengeance in V for Vendetta. Using revenge in mediums uch as literature and film assists communicate the main idea within them. Similar to numerous novels and films, the themes that are present in them base themselves on some form of reality, which is the case with the style of vengeance. One such example in society would be the well-known case of the 47 Ronin, a group of Japanese samurai who avenge their fallen master by decapitating his killer. People see justice as the universal conciliator in which the victim receives payment for a crime done to them. On the other hand, people see revenge as a personal mission for the ictim to discover settlement for harm done to them, no matter the cost. While monetary compensation and jail time might be ideal for some circumstances such as scams and theft, is it acceptable when it comes to a murder? Should individuals consider justice and vengeance as two different ideas? After all, justice represents fairness and that is what revenge has to do with, just not in an ethically right method. Works Cited Dumas, Alexandre. The Count of Monte Cristo. London, England: Penguin, 2003. Print. V for Vendetta. Dir. James McTeigue. Perf.

Natalie Portman, Hugo Weaving. Warner Bros. Home entertainment Inc., 2006. DVD. Works Consulted Dumas, Alexandre. The Count of Monte Cristo. London, England: Penguin, 2003. Print. SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on The Count of Monte Cristo.” SparkNotes. com. SparkNotes LLC. 2002. Web. 26 Nov. 2013. V for Vendetta. Dir. James McTeigue. Perf. Natalie Portman, Hugo Weaving. Warner Bros. Home entertainment Inc., 2006. DVD. “V for Vendetta Quotes.” Goodreads. N. p., 16 Apr. 2012. Web. 15 Nov. 2013. <
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