The Count of Monte Cristo Captivated and Intrigued Readers for Centurie

The Count of Monte Cristo

Garret M. Gwozdz Ms. Vertiz English I-H./ 4 28 March 2013 The Mad Twins The Count of Monte Cristo, written by Alexandre Dumas in 1845, has actually captivated and intrigued readers for centuries, with its various gothic aspects and themes. It was composed in France during the time after Napoleon was dismissed in 1844. Alexandre Dumas took a trip of Southern France in 1834 and much of the info that he got on the tour was used to compose this unique including the City of Marseille.

The unique, with its complex and varied range of characters and their relations, is cluttered with gothic referrals, themes, and signs. 3 specific concepts that Dumas consistently utilized throughout the plot are the Faust, and doppelgangers to reveal that Dantes believes he is effective enough to control and control other individuals, and he Dumas likewise utilizes a magic talisman to reveal the shift Edmond makes from a naive seaman to a master manipulator. One theme found frequently in The Count of Monte Cristo is the Faust.

After Dantes leaves jail he really believes that he is capable of anything and that nobody can stop him. Renee Winegarten says that “The Count of Monte Cristo, himself, has a fabulous endless amount of wealth and the immense power it provides him,” (Winegarten 13). Edmond Dantes controls people’s fates practically as if he has a right to do so. He has fun with their lives like puppets and they mostly respond precisely how he prepared it, with couple of exceptions. On the subject of power, Franz states this to the count:

But, with such an outlook, that makes you the judge and executioner in your own case, it would be difficult for you to confine yourself to actions that would leave you permanently immune to the power of the law. Hatred is blind and anger deaf: the one who puts himself a cup of revenge is likely to consume a bitter draught. (Dumas 444) But, with such an outlook, that makes you the judge and executioner in your own case, it would be difficult for you to confine yourself to actions that would leave you forever immune to the power of the law.

Hatred is blind and anger deaf: the one who puts himself a cup of revenge is likely to drink a bitter draught. (Dumas 444) That is precisely what The Count thinks and he understands that no-one will stop him. When Dantes abuses Danglars, the outlaw Luigi remarks that “For 3 days the name of God was continuously on Danglars’ lips, if not in his heart.” (Dumas 521). This provides the reader a best example that The Count is acting like God. He is toying with Danglars and will continue to till, in his mind, he is equal.

The name that he assumes even has a considerable meaning behind it. Monte Cristo, suggesting mountain of Christ in Italian, shows that Edmond believes himself to be an equivalent if not greater the Jesus Christ himself. Although Dantes total usages his power for alarming factors, there are several circumstances where he uses his supremacy for worthy reasons. The way Edmond conserves Morrel is the best example of how he utilizes his influence for excellent intent, however at the exact same time he is in camouflage as Abbe Busoni. Edmond Dantes also utilizes many disguises throughout the whole novel.

He and his many doppelgangers are the main source of confusion for a lot of readers. At some time in the plot he is called by the name of: Edmond Dantes, The Count of Monte Cristo, Sinbad the Sailor, Abbe Busoni, and Lord Wilmore. The reader can analyze these numerous attempts of Edmond altering his identity as a way of hiding his real self since of the shamefulness he feels about his previous life of being such a naive, dim-witted, sailor. R. Brustein composes “Dantes really doesn’t like who he is and was and so adopts pseudonyms a number of times.” (Brustein 14).

His disguises were beyond doubt a work of genius and just one person, Mercedes, can compare him and his disguises. He hides himself and his real sensations so well that in one minute he can hate someone and the next he can conspire with him. Renee Winegarten mentions that, “The Count of Monte Cristo … was a master of impenetrable camouflage.” (Winegarten 22). Edmond uses his aliases as another method to control people, by participating in their lives as an innocent next-door neighbor, or to be accepted by society and get in the classy Parisian culture.

He lets them trust him and after that exposes his real identity and betrays them. His need for his victims to understand that it is Edmond Dantes who did all these things to them is a real mark of how mad he actually is, and it also shows that below a cloak of invincibility is actually simply a crazy psychopath. The reader can attribute most of these characteristics to his time spent in the Chateau d’if and his time spent in a cell with Abbe Faria. Abbe Faria is a senior Italian priest with Bonapartist and Pan-Italian compassions who was jailed at the Chateau d’If 4 years before Dantes.

The jail guards feel that Faria seethes since he has actually used them part of an excellent treasure, which they do not believe exists, if he is released. Faria becomes Dantes’ instructor, having accidentally tunneled into Dantes’ cell. (Williams 2) Abbe Faria is a senior Italian priest with Bonapartist and Pan-Italian compassions who was incarcerated at the Chateau d’If 4 years prior to Dantes. The prison guards feel that Faria is mad due to the fact that he has actually offered them part of a terrific treasure, which they do not think exists, if he is launched. Faria becomes Dantes’ instructor, having inadvertently tunneled into Dantes’ cell. Williams 2) His time invested with Abbe Faria is a great time of enlightenment for Edmond Dantes. The Abbe deals with Edmond like a son and teaches him whatever he knows and even provides him the whole treasure of spada. Faria has a past that has actually assisted him acquire knowledge of the world and he teaches Edmond most of what he understands: “I are sorry for now”, stated he, “having actually assisted you in your late queries, or having actually offered you the info I did.” “Why so?” asked Dantes. “Because it has instilled a new passion in your heart that of revenge. (Dumas 194) “I regret now”, stated he, “having actually assisted you in your late questions, or having actually given you the info I did.” “Why so?” asked Dantes. “Because it has actually instilled a new passion in your heart that of revenge.” (Dumas 194) Faria is a great teacher and reveals Edmond lots of things such as math, science, politics, literatures, and abstract thought. Faria has the understanding of the area of the Treasure of Spada and informs Dantes where it is. Faria provides him everything he has including all of his understanding and even his own life. Faria states:

The Abbe understands that Edmond plans to seek vengeance on all of individuals that mistreated him and disagreed with his objectives but also recognizes that he can not stop Dantes from carrying out these plans. This quote likewise shows that Faria has great character and understands right from wrong although those lines are blurred. Faria even sacrifices himself so that Edmond can get away. Faria tells Edmond “‘Hush! Hush!’ murmured the dying man, ‘that they may not separate us if you conserve me! ‘” (Dumas 225). This quote shows that the Abbe knows what freedom expenses and is willing to pay it for Edmond.

The reader can acknowledge this as a significant pivotal moment in the novel as this story changes from a novel of captivity to one of experience and vengeance. The Count of Monte Cristo is an unique that has captivated readers for centuries. Nearly all of the characters within the plot are vibrant. The characters relationships are complex and diverse. The gothic components that Alexandre Dumas integrates within this book are outstanding. The motifs that he utilizes consisting of the magic talisman, doppelgangers, and the Faust are extremely in depth.

They reveal that people are incapable of having excessive power and will eventually abuse that power, this is true in literature and in history. The Count of Monte Cristo is a gothic book that deals with lost loves, the change of character, and vengeance. Works Cited Dumas, Alexandre. The Count of Monte Cristo. New York: Random House, 1996. Print. Winegarten, Renne. Alexandre Dumas: Reality and Fiction. Detroit: Windstorm, 2003. Print. Brustein, Robert. The Naked and the Dressed. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Print Williams, A. N. “Cerebrovascular disease in Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo” National Center of Biotechnology information (2003 ): Web.

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