Savagery in Lord of the Flies

Savagery in Lord of the Flies

In “Lord of the Flies,” William Golding presents a rather cynical view upon human nature. Golding highlights through symbolism and characters that the instinctual evil that lies within every person is unavoidable. It is demonstrated throughout the book, that without the restrictions and penalties produced by society to demonstrate a democratic state, people would eventually lose touch of civilization and turn towards barbaric methods to satisfy one of the most standard requirements. Therefore, a mortal being is naturally wicked, and the evil has actually constantly been within a vulnerable person’s soul, and is just waiting to be launched.
Inevitably within every person there is an aggressive but often misunderstood struggle in between the right and wrong. Initially at the start of the novel, with the efficient leadership of Ralph and the intellectual thinking of Piggy, the kids were able to act according to the moral ideologies present throughout their upbringing, and listen to their unconcerned and uncorrupted conscience. With the conch in power to govern the boys’ meetings and bring order and civilization to the society they were yet to establish. The kids seemingly were capable of casting their own individual barriers behind to designate tasks, build shelters and reside in perfect unified consistency in what might have been referred to as the Garden of Eve in the perspective of Ralph as “he may have been swimming in a substantial bath”, and “set foot on a carefree island of everlasting paradise”. As time progressed though, Jack who is the villain, and indeed the foil character of Ralph starts to reveal the progressively apparent and more savage side of humanity. His nervous desire for authority gives him the strength to eliminate another living being, as it is described strongly that “His mind was crowded with memories; memories of the knowledge that had pertained to them when they surrounded the having a hard time pig, knowledge that they had outsmarted a living thing, imposed their will upon it, taken away its life like a long satisfying drink”. Jack begins to assist the kids, which in perspective represents society, into the barbaric customizeds of killing just for the exhilarating sensation of power and superiority over another animal. Therefore, at that point, Golding indicates that the tendency of evil is something that is within the primal impulses of children nevertheless unconcerned and pure they are to begin with.
As the controversial problem of the true nature of human beings is explored further in Lord of the Flies, you are introduced to The Monster. In the unique, this fictional symbol scares the kids, and particularly afflicted the “littluns” with worry, and supplies more evidence that the primitive instinct of savagery does exist within all humans. As the boys grew frantically brutal, their belief in the monster increased and grew more powerful to a point of worship, driven strictly by fear. Jack, severed plant’s heads in which he impales on a stake ends up being an attractive offering to the monster, for that reason it ends up being the most essential sign in the unique, and is provided the name, “Lord of the Flies.” This complex symbol practically signifies the end of the innocence amongst the young boys, for when Simon, who can be biblically connected to Jesus, goes through a hallucination and confronts the sow’s head. It speaks to him, and tells him that the evil lies within every human heart and “There isn’t anybody to help you. Only me. And I’m the Monster … Fancy thinking the Monster was something you could hunt and eliminate! … You understood, didn’t you? I belong to you? Close, close, close! I’m the reason why it’s no go? Why things are the method they are?”
Seemingly, evil is among children, as it is shown in Lord of the Flies that it is a quality that can occur when one’s mind is corrupted. Therefore, one can say it has constantly been in adults, and the capability of evil people are capable of, is to an extent, really extreme and unpredictable. As humankind develops the more blemished and damaged it becomes, although one can claim this maturity and new gotten understanding as evil, or just the dark realism discovered present in society. As “Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of male’s heart, and the fall through the air of a true, smart buddy called piggy”, it is quite clear that Golding is attempting to indicate that Ralph can never ever truly be the same, with his new found understanding of the capability of evil he can, and what lies beneath his own morals and consciousness.
In conclusion, through the realism of humanity presented in Lord of the Flies, and the ideology that bitterly implicates that humans are inherently evil. One can securely say that without the laws and restrictions that are troubled society, humankind would eventually cause damage and embody the barbaric and primitive qualities of a savage struggling merely for survival.

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