Innocence in Lord of the Flies

Innocence in Lord of the Flies

Ernest Hemingway once said, “All things genuinely wicked start from innocence.” This expression can be proven real through the novel Lord of the Flies by William Golding. In this unique, a group of young kids are dropped onto an unoccupied island during the war. They should hunt to endure, and develop rules and a leader so that their life on the island can run rather smoothly. Through The Lord of the Flies, Golding reveals that when individuals must adapt and make it through in difficult situations, they lose their innocence.
One way the loss of innocence is seen is through the rules not being followed since there is nobody to impose them. We can see this through the conch shell. The kids designate a conch shell as a product of importance; anyone holding the conch can speak and individuals not holding the conch needs to be quiet and listen. As the young boys begin to disagree on more topics and the assemblies end up being more chaotic, the significance of the conch and the quantity of people who follow it begins to diminish. Jacks says, “Conch! Conch! We do not require the conch any more. We understand who ought to state things” (Golding 101/102). The way that Jack says “any more” shows that while they once needed the conch, they no longer do and shows the rules decreasing and not being followed. As the natural born-leaders begin to emerge, the guidelines made in consideration for the peaceful are lost. That is seen when he states “we know who should say things”. He is indicating that some boys need to not deserve to speak or give their opinions, and the very first of which that enters your mind being Piggy.
Another example of the rules ending up being lesser is the unimportance and disagreement of who is the chief. At first, the young boys elect Ralph as their chief however Jack being the leader and tyrant that he is, he often disagrees and attempts to take the position.” ‘And you shut up! Who are you, anyway? Sitting there informing individuals what to do. You can’t hunt, you can’t sing-‘ ‘I’m [Ralph] chief. I was chosen.’ ‘Why should choosing make any difference? Simply offering orders that do not make any sense-‘ “(Golding 91). Jack is always informing individuals to “shut up”, which shows a disrespect for the other young boys which he does not care to hear what they are stating. He only feels that his input is necessary, which suggests he ignores Ralph, the leader’s, opinions also. It is also clear that he sees himself as the most qualified to be chief, because he states “you can’t hunt, you can’t sing-” which are 2 skills that Jack possesses and apparently sees required for a leader. Additionally, its coherent that Jack disagrees with Ralph’s method of leading and the directions he gives when he says “Just providing orders that don’t make any sense-“.
Finally, we see the loss of guidelines through the crimes and sins that the kids dedicate. When Ralph, Piggy, Jack, and his tribe members are arguing over Piggy’s glasses, Roger is on top of a perch with a large stone held back by a lever. The boys continue to bicker, and Roger loses all sense of morals and pulls the lever, dropping the rock onto Piggy and eliminating him. “High overhead, Roger, with a sense of delirious abandonment, leaned all his weight on the lever. The rock struck Piggy a glancing blow from chin to knee: […] Piggy fell 40 feet and arrived at his back throughout the square red rock in the sea. His head opened and stuff came out and reddened. Piggy’s arms and legs jerked a bit, like a pigs after it has actually been killed” (Golding 180/181). The death of Piggy was totally random and unnecessary, fueled by the lack of guidance and amorality of Roger and similarly, the rest of the young boys. “Delirious desertion” shows how little Roger takes care of the guidelines and the difference in between best and wrong, and in a state of crazed bliss he makes a decision that ends a life without any consequences to follow.
Another way we can see the loss of innocence is through the boys’ loss of youth and all of the obligations that they get. One responsibility that takes over the boys’ lives is searching. While initially Jack and his choir are attempting to hunt for survival, it becomes their main focus and they begin to eliminate for no great reason.” [Jack] attempted to communicate the compulsion to track down and eliminate that was swallowing him up. “I went on. I thought, by myself-” The insanity came into his eyes again. “I believed I may kill” (Golding 51). You can see the insanity that takes control of Jack when he thinks of eliminating. The word “compulsion” shows how he feels like he requires to eliminate in order to satisfy himself. No common twelve years of age kid ought to feel this obsession unless they have lost their childish innocence.
Also, the young kids’ idea of “playing” and having fun has twisted given that they arrived at the island. As the boys all hung out by the water and in the sand, we can see Roger’s concept of fun is different from the normal child, or perhaps even his idea of fun back in the house. “Roger gathered a handful of stones and began to throw them. Yet there was a space round Henry, maybe 6 backyards in size, into which he dare not toss. Here, undetectable yet strong, was the taboo of the old life. […] Roger’s arm was conditioned by a civilization that knew absolutely nothing of him and remained in ruins” (Golding 64). Roger tries to toss rocks at a young boy for a fun, which is uncommon but likewise various from his past. “Yet there was an area round Henry […] Here, unnoticeable yet strong, was the taboo of the old life.” This piece of the quotes shows that Roger’s old life is holding him back from actually striking Henry with the stones, because it was something he was taught not to do. Nevertheless, we can see through his attempt that his concept of having a good time is different and more substantial than it formerly was. We can likewise see through “a civilization that knew absolutely nothing of him and remained in ruins” that the hidden style of civilization is collapsing on the island, and the boys are become more savage and lose touch with their previous knowledge of right and incorrect.
One last responsibility that the kids achieve is keeping the fire going. Ralph in specific feels strongly about keeping a signal fire burning, so that they can be seen by a passing ship and ideally be rescued. This duty is passed off from kid to kid, but the people typically have problem doing what they are told. Nonetheless, it is a substantial part of the young boys’ lives on the island. “There’s another thing. We can assist them to discover us. If a ship comes near the island they might not notice us. So we must make smoke on top of the mountain. We must make a fire”(Golding 38). This quote shows Ralph almost appointing the job to the young boys and the way he duplicates “must” shows that he sees it as essential.
Finally, we see the boys lose their child-like innocence through their cruelty and the hanus actions they have. One method the young boys show their cruelty is through savagery and the disregard for others. The young boys have a “mock pig” who they practice assaulting and have an enjoyable time doing it. They throw him in the center of the circle of young boys and practically take turns. “At one time, Robert was shrieking and fighting with the strength of craze. Jack had him by the hair and was brandishing his knife. […] The chant increased ritually, as at the last minute of a dance or a hunt. “Eliminate the pig! Cut his throat! Kill the pig! Slam him in!” Ralph too was battling to get near, to get a handful of that brown, susceptible flesh. The desire to capture and hurt was over-mastering” (Golding 114/115). Jack grabbing him by his hair and threatening with him a knife all for entertainment demonstrates how harsh the young boys have ended up being. Likewise, “the chant rose ritually, as at last moment of a dance or a hunt” demonstrates how this barbarous act has actually ended up being a procedure to them, and just how much they truly enjoy it. Nobody without a despiteful mind could take pleasure in harming an innocent young boy, especially among their peers, like they do.
Another way we see the young boys demonstrate cruelty is when they slaughter the pig. Jack and his hunters are understood for killing pigs, but once they have actually done it more than as soon as they no longer eliminate for the function of survival, however for “enjoyable”. “Here, overruled by the heat, the plant fell and the hunters hurled themselves at her. This awful eruption from an unidentified world made her frenzied; she screeched and bucked and the air had plenty of sweat and noise and blood and terror [] The spear moved on inch by inch and the horrified screeching ended up being a high-pitched scream. Then Jack found the throat and the hot blood spouted over his hands. The sow collapsed under them […] At last the immediacy of the kill decreased. The young boys drew back, and Jack stood up, holding out his hands. “Look.” He giggled and flecked them while the young boys made fun of his reeking palms. Then Jack got Maurice and rubbed the things over his cheeks … ‘Right up her ass!'” (Golding 135). Not only do the young boys eliminate the sow for no function, but they likewise eliminate her heartlessly and have definitely no respect for her as a living being. “Jack got Maurice and rubbed the things over his cheeks”, Jack takes the blood of the sow and puts it on Maurice’s face as if it is war paint. Not just is that revolting, however it demonstrates how they see the death of a living animal is a video game to them. “Right up her ass!” this action displays how all they desire is complete dominance and power over the animal. This scene can almost be compared to a rape scene, which is likewise true considering that most rapists are seeking supremacy over someone who is defenseless or weaker than them.
Eventually, the kids show ruthlessness in its use to get power. Jack especially is impolite and hurtful to the young boys because he sees himself as if he is much better than them, so he uses his ruthlessness to make the young boys fear him, therefore offering him power. Piggy uses to choose Ralph, Jack, and Roger, however Jack turns him down because he does not desire Piggy to come.” ‘You’re no great on a task like this.’ ‘All the very same-‘ ‘We don’t want you.’ stated Jack, flatly. ‘3’s enough'” (Golding 23). Jack blatantly says to Piggy that he is not good enough to come with them, which is painful specifically given that he is continuously putting Piggy down. You can likewise see how “flatly” Jack speaks, having no feeling in his voice. It does not phase him at all to be rude, it’s simply his nature and the cruelty that he has actually adjusted to.
In conclusion, William Golding exhibits the idea that when individuals need to adjust and endure in tight spots, they lose their innocence. That is clear to see in the novel Lord of the Flies through the loss of rules, the gain of responsibilities, and the newly found cruelty that the kids have. This is an example that proves that all things genuinely wicked start from innocence.

This div height required for enabling the sticky sidebar